Renaissance BioScience receives funding to advance next-generation yeast R&D

By Gill Hyslop contact

- Last updated on GMT

The National Research Council of Canada is giving Renaissance BioScience a funding boost to further develop its novel yeasts. Pic: ©iStock/13-Smile
The National Research Council of Canada is giving Renaissance BioScience a funding boost to further develop its novel yeasts. Pic: ©iStock/13-Smile

Related tags: Yeast, Bread, Research

Renaissance BioScience Corp. (RSBC) has been given a C$500 0000 (US$370,000) boost by the Government of Canada to advance its next-generation yeasts.

RSBC has received a multi-year, non-repayable contribution from the National Research Council of Canada Industrial Research Assistance Program (NRC-IRAP) to further its research and development on its proprietary, non-GMO yeast strains.

The privately-held applied life sciences company develops novel yeast strains for commercialization for the global food and beverage industries, including Acrylow, an acrylamide-reducing yeast for baked goods and snacks.

Axing acrylamide

Studies have shown that acrylamide – a by-product of heating asparagine, an amino acid naturally found in carbohydrate-rich foods like dough, bread and toast – can cause cancers and other major ailments.

However, RSBC has developed a yeast that naturally reduces acrylamide by consuming asparagine with asparaginase, a protein that is normally inactive.

Using traditional techniques, the researchers have adapted the yeast to activate the asparaginase protein and its acrylamide-reducing ability.

According to Dr Matthew Dahabieh, chief science officer at RSBC, the monies from IRAP will aid RSBC to further research on next-generation non-GMO yeasts and will enable to company to commercialize them.

Related topics: R&D, Ingredients, Bread

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