Novozymes sets new standards in gluten strengthening to improve bread dough in tough climates

By Gill Hyslop contact

- Last updated on GMT

Novozymes said its Gluzyme Fortis withstand tough conditions and helps bakeries produce bread wherever they are in the world, especially those who operate in warm climates and remote areas. Pic: GettyImages/bonchan
Novozymes said its Gluzyme Fortis withstand tough conditions and helps bakeries produce bread wherever they are in the world, especially those who operate in warm climates and remote areas. Pic: GettyImages/bonchan

Related tags: Novozymes, glucose oxidase, Gluten, Acrylamide, European commission

Novozymes has developed a enzymatic solution that makes it easier for bakers to handle dough and produce bread under warm and difficult climatic conditions.

The route to a great loaf is paved with challenges.

Inconsistent and long supply chains with varying storage temperatures mean raw materials are exposed to extreme and touch climatic conditions, which impact their performance in production, as well as the end result of the bread.

Novozymes is making the task just that little bit easier with the introduction of Gluzyme Fortis, which it claims sets a new standard in gluten strengthening and improving dough.

Gluzyme Fortis is based on a glucose oxidase, an enzyme already used in many bakery formulations to improve dough processability.

What makes the new solution stand out, though, is that it is even more consistent and robust than other glucose oxidase solutions currently on the market, including Novozymes’ original glucose oxidase.

It is also the first shelf stable glucose oxidase on the market and can be stored at ambient temperatures for two years.

“Novozymes has made a new solution to help the industry meet these challenges by developing improvers, corrected flour or pre-mixes that withstand tough conditions in the supply chain and during production of the bread,”​ said Adam Benjamin Vestergaard Diggle, director at Novozymes.

“We’ve developed Gluzyme Fortis to withstand tough conditions and help bakeries produce bread wherever they are in the world, and especially for those who operate in warm climates and remote areas.

“It comes with built in robustness to the temperature variations that may occur to improvers, flour and pre-mixes during storage and transportation,”​ added Diggle.

“It’s a biological way to improve dough machinability and to produce bread with great volume, nice bloom and an appealing appearance.”

Novozymes is rolling out Gluzyme Fortis worldwide.

Are you ready for the revised acrylamide regulations?

Novozymes is also poised to help producers tackle the EU commission’s revised benchmark levels of acrylamide, expected to be announced in April 2020.

Following calls for tougher acrylamide targets, the European Commission will be issuing new regulation on the maximum levels of acrylamide – lower than current benchmark levels – in various products, especially biscuits, rusks and cereal foods targeted at infants and children.

Acrylamide is a suspected carcinogen that forms naturally in food during frying, baking or extrusion at high heat and low moisture.  

“The new acrylamide regulation currently being drafted by the European Commission will increase the requirements for food producers to legally sell their products in the EU,”​ said Hans Christian Lindstrøm Wegge, marketing manager, Baking, Novozymes.

“If the regulation is adopted, it will be a tough challenge for the industry to continuously ensure low acrylamide levels in food products.” 

Novozyme’s answer is Acrylaway, which it claims to cut acrylamide content by up to 95% in bakery products, helping producers to maintain compliance under the new regulations.

First launched in 2007, Acrylaway’s robustness and lack of impact on product quality and production capacity makes it an ideal solution for mitigating acrylamide levels in a consistent way, said the company.

Being an enzymatic solution, it also does not require any ingredients or process changes, and does not impact the eating experience of the final product. 

Related topics: Ingredients, Regulation & Safety

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