DISPATCHES FROM PROCESS EXPO 2013

Videojet tackles tough processing environments

By Jenni Spinner contact

- Last updated on GMT

Related tags: Videojet technologies, Food

Because food processing environments can be tough, they need equipment up and down the line to stand up to the harsh conditions.

Videojet Technologies provides coding and marking equipment for food processing and packaging operations. Eric Davis, national account manager for Videojet, told FoodProductionDaily.com that such equipment needs to be designed to endure wet environments, fluctuating temperatures, chemical exposure and other factors, particularly in meat and poultry processing.

They have sanitation shifts, where they have to do washdowns with water, chemicals, that sort of thing​,” he said. “It’s very important to have equipment that can hold up to that type of environment​.”

By designing equipment that can endure exposure to water and chemicals, Davis said, plant managers avoid having to remove the equipment prior to washdowns, then replace them. This helps save costs by cutting maintenance and downtime.

Also, Davis told FPD that the company’s marking and coding gear is designed to be flexible. This can be beneficial in helping operations prepare and adjust for regulatory requirements, such as the Food Safety Modernization Act.

Watch the video to learn more about Videojet’s heavy-duty equipment.

Related topics: Processing & Packaging

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1 comment

IP Rating

Posted by Adam,

While I agree that wash down is very important in the food industry, the main question is what is your IP rating? An IP55 or IP65 rated system is not a "fully washdown" system. Majority of the industries use pressurized water 60psi or higher to wash their systems which would make the VideoJet and other IPx5 systems a risk for water ingress. I question these statements and accuracy and also question how many people wash down their line with sprinklers like the one shown in the video.

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