High-fiber breads: Clean label and sensory pitfalls plugged, says DuPont

By Kacey Culliney

- Last updated on GMT

Related tags: Baker, Bread

New enzyme blend plugs clean label, quality high-fiber breads, says DuPont
New enzyme blend plugs clean label, quality high-fiber breads, says DuPont
Ingredients giant DuPont has developed an enzyme blend to meet consumer demands for improved sensory quality and clean label in wholemeal, wholegrain and added-fiber breads, it said.

The latest development builds upon its bakery ingredient system Grindsted Fiberline.

“Our market driven research and development (R&D) team have been working hard to develop a solution which fulfils the consumer need for a better sensorial quality wholemeal bread,”​ Anne Host Stenbak, industry marketing manager for DuPont Nutrition & Health, told BakeryandSnacks.com.

Fiberline is a pure enzyme complex (blend), unlike the previous system that was a blend of enzymes and emulsifiers, Stenbak said.

“This enables bakers to meet consumer demands for clean label wholemeal, wholegrain and added-fibre breads,”​ she said.

It ensures softness and freshness in wholemeal bread while increasing dietary fiber intake, she added.

Sensory troubles with high-fiber

“The latest advances in enzyme technology have given viable opportunities to overcome common sensory pitfalls and bake soft, high-volume bread with unrivalled fresh-keeping properties and a consumer-friendly label,”​ DuPont said.

The new enzyme complex has displayed an ability to strengthen the gluten structure and slow the staling process, it added.

However, the firm did suggest that the lack of emulsifiers in this new blend could compromise overall sensory properties of high-fiber breads.

“Bakers also can choose to add emulsifiers alongside the enzyme complex to achieve an even better sensory quality than obtainable when baking high-fiber bread with enzymes only,”​ DuPont said. 

Related topics: Ingredients, Bread, Health

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