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Study backs fibre-based satiety ingredient to reduce food intake

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By Nathan Gray+

28-Aug-2014
Last updated on 28-Aug-2014 at 14:26 GMT

“The results of this study show that a new composite satiety ingredient comprised of a viscous fibre and whole-grain corn flour can affect acute satiety responses in men and women,” said the University of Liverpool research team.
“The results of this study show that a new composite satiety ingredient comprised of a viscous fibre and whole-grain corn flour can affect acute satiety responses in men and women,” said the University of Liverpool research team.

A novel composite satiety ingredient from made up of a viscous fibre and whole-grain corn flour can help to boost satiety responses in men and women, say researchers.

The new research, published in Food & Function, investigated how the novel satiety ingredient made up of co-processed viscous fibre and whole-grain high-amylose corn flour (a source of type 1 and type 2 resistant starch) impacted appetite and food intake. The novel blend, known as Weightain and produced by US-based ingredients firm Ingredion, was found to make people feel fuller for longer and influenced the amount of food they ate.

“This is the first study to examine the short term effect of this particular combination of fibres on appetite and food intake,” explained Dr Jo Harrold from the University of Liverpool’s Human Ingestive Behaviour Laboratory – who led the research. “Whilst more research is needed to measure these effects of the product over longer periods of time and in people who are actively trying to lose weight, this study demonstrates high fibre food products which make you feel fuller could provide a potential solution to weight management.”

The research, which was funded by Ingredion, found that food intake at both lunch and dinner times were lower when the satiety ingredient was given at breakfast compared to the control.

“What is notable is this product, given with breakfast, produced effects on appetite, which were apparent across the day. This is important when consumers are seeking help controlling they hunger across the day,” added Professor Jason Halford.

Study details

Harrold and her colleagues tested the effects of the Weightain ingredient in 90 normal to overweight participants. Each was given a fruit-based smoothie for breakfast containing a dose of either 20 grams or 30g of the satiety ingredient or a non-active (maltodextrin) control. Their subsequent intake of food at both lunch and dinner on that day was measured and their levels of hunger examined.

The study showed that food intake at both lunch and dinner times were lower when the satiety ingredient was given at breakfast compared to the control. Overall, after the 20g dose 4% fewer calories were eaten and after the 30g dose 5% less food was eaten at both lunch and dinner combined, said the team.

At lunchtime, 5% less food was consumed after the 20g dose than after the control. At dinner time participants ate 7% fewer calories after the 30g dose compared to when they had the smoothie made without the satiety blend.

Lower hunger levels after breakfast were recorded for both doses – with the team reporting that the 30g dose also produced lower hunger levels after lunch.

“The results of this study show that a new composite satiety ingredient comprised of a viscous fibre and whole-grain corn flour can affect acute satiety responses in men and women,” they concluded.

Source: Food & Function
Published online ahead of print, doi: 10.1039/C4FO00253A
“Satiety effects of a whole-grain fibre composite ingredient: reduced food intake and appetite ratings”
Authors: Joanne Harrold, Leanne Breslin, Jennifer Walsh, Jason Halford, Christine Pelkman

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