SUBSCRIBE

Breaking News on Industrial Baking & Snacks

News > R&D

Read more breaking news

 

 
Patent Watch

General Mills files patent for sodium-reduction via enhanced saltiness

1 comment

By Kacey Culliney+

21-Aug-2014
Last updated on 22-Aug-2014 at 12:58 GMT2014-08-22T12:58:51Z

General Mills has looked closely at the carbon structures of salt-enhancing compounds, one example being horse chestnut
General Mills has looked closely at the carbon structures of salt-enhancing compounds, one example being horse chestnut

General Mills has developed a method to enhance perceived saltiness using taste-modulating bioactive compounds, thus enabling sodium reduction.

The method could be applied to a raft of products, it said, from breakfast cereals, snacks and dough to soups, beverages and dairy products.

Carbon structure key

The cereal giant investigated the carbon structure of natural bioactive compounds – plant, fungi and microbial – and found that ingredients associated with increased salt perception had common carbon structure patterns.

Examples included horse chestnut [aesculus hippocastaneum], chili pepper [capsicum annuum], English lavender [lavandula officinalis] and apple guava [psidium guajava].

These findings, it said, enabled a selection of bioactive compounds and combinations that could improve the perceived saltiness of a product, thus enabling a reduction in sodium content. Use could either “elicit the perception of saltiness or enhance saltiness”, it detailed in the patent filing.

For breakfast cereals and snack products, sodium content could be reduced by as much as 10 mg per serving using these compounds, it said.

Snack products it could be used in included potato and corn chips, pretzels, fruit snacks to trail mixes, among others. For grain-based goods like breakfast cereal, dough and bars, the compounds could even be used for products made using pseudo cereals like sorghum, millet and teff, General Mills said.

Taste security

The upside of replacing sodium with bioactive compounds was taste, the company said.

Many attempts had been made to provide salty tasting compositions as a substitute for table salt that would give the same or a similar seasoning effect, it said, such as potassium chloride, ammonium chloride and other similar compounds. However, it said use of such options left “much to be desired as to taste”.

“Neither of them individually or in combination positively affects other taste modalities and tastes like sodium chloride. Each alone has a disagreeable taste, as do mixtures of such salts. For example, potassium chloride has a strong aftertaste that is characterized as ‘bitter’ by most people. Ammonium chloride also has a bitter aftertaste.”

Processing

The bioactive compounds could be extracted using water, solvents, supercritical carbon dioxide or other volatilization methods, it said, and then stabilized with encapsulation or chemical reactions to simple sugars or small chain fatty acids.

The compounds would have to be ‘carried’ in the product, General Mills said, with water, ethanol, oil or even starch.

Previous sodium reduction work

Late last year, General Mills filed another patent on an alternative sodium reduction and fat replacement method that relied on salt-flavored fat particles.

It developed shortening chips (fat particles) that incorporated salt flavoring, meaning use of salt flavor could be slashed by around 50%.

1 comment (Comments are now closed)

Another solution to a non-existent problem

The available science says salt reduction in the diet wiill result in lower health outcomes and that the American diet is right in the center of the "Safe" consumption range. The only country in the world that consumes 1,500 mg sodium or less - the AHA and Dietary Guideline target is Kenya, with a life expectancy of 60 years! The food industry is not responding to the science, but to the same cranks that brought us all the fat-reduction-driven obesity crisis.

Report abuse

Posted by Morton Satin
22 August 2014 | 15h562014-08-22T15:56:16Z

Related products

Key Industry Events

 

Access all events listing

Our events, Events from partners...

Live Supplier Webinars

Using Barley to Formulate Healthy Food Products
Alberta Barley Commission

On demand Supplier Webinars

Raising the Bar: Ingredients, Claims and Increasing Consumer Appeal
Almond Board of California
All supplier webinars